The Shalem Foundation was established in 1983 by the Federation of Local Authorities in cooperation with the Ministry of Social Affairs and Social Services. The foundation works to develop comprehensive services and resources for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities throughout the country.

The Vision of the Shalem Foundation
"People with developmental intellectual disabilities have the basic right to live normal lives within their natural surroundings, to realize their hidden potential, and to be socially, culturally, and occupationally integrated into the community as much as possible, according to their abilities, desires, and needs."
The Shalem Foundation has played a key role in impacting the lives of people with disabilities and their families. The foundation’s multifaceted team continuously strives to develop innovative programs to improve the quality of life of people with disabilities and include them in all aspects of society. The Shalem Foundation understands the complex needs of these individuals and those around them. As these needs change throughout the course of their lives, The Shalem Foundation aims to help every step of the way.
The Shalem Foundation Assists in the Following Areas:
• Funding of physical development of community facilities
• Funding and support of innovative social services and programs for people with developmental disabilities 
• Funding and development of advanced educational and tutoring programs for professionals
• Funding and assistance with artistic productions by people with intellectual and developmental disabilities
• Creation and support of activities that promote and change way of thinking and attitudes towards people with intellectual and developmental disabilities
• Funding of research, professional knowledge development and models, training and conferences
The Shalem Foundation provides funding for approximately 200 projects and initiatives throughout Israel each year. The organization works in full cooperation with local councils, representatives of the Ministry of Social Affairs & Social Services and other nonprofit organizations throughout Israel.
The Shalem Foundation encourages new ideas and activities in the field of intellectual and developmental disabilities and offers annual awards to heads of regional councils, public figures and volunteers. The Foundation also awards prizes for excellence to regional councils and individuals with intellectual disabilities who have contributed to society or to unique projects.

The Shalem Foundation has made a number of strategic goals for the years 2015-2020. They include:
1. Changing perceptions and inclusion of people with disabilities in all aspects of daily life. This includes development of a unique enterprise that will offer a glimpse into the world of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The center will be the first of its kind in the world and will enable partnership with people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.
2. Capacity building, training, applied research, knowledge and skill development for professional workers and caretakers of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. 
3. An incubator for change: the Shalem foundation invites all initiatives which promote the inclusion of people with disabilities in society as well as bettering their quality of life.
The Shalem Foundation is dedicated to utilizing the potential of every person with intellectual disabilities in order to provide them with the best possible quality of life as well as educating society as a whole to be more inclusive and caring. 
The expression of a humanist orientation in the perception and attitude of service providers who accompany and support people with IDD and in the perception of service recipients regarding their abilities and their lives   Catalog # 890-83-2018| Other authors: Nirit Karni Vize, Ran Neuman  

This work was supported by a grant from Shalem Fund
The present study examined the extent to which the humanistic orientation permeates the perception of the service provider working with people with Intellectual Developmental Disability, IDD, and the relationship between him and the recipient of his support. In the sample included 61 service providers and 95 service recipients. Findings indicated that the sample was divided between those who expressed Humanistic orientation compared to those with a medical perception; the humanists gave high assessment scores regarding the ability of their service recipients; a positive correlation was found between the 'giver and the recipient's assessments of the latter. A humanistic orientation is a necessary condition for the service recipient to experience himself and his life in a positive and optimistic way. It also invites mutuality in the interpersonal relationships between supporter and recipient

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For the English Abstract press here

Key words
People with intellectual developmental disabilities
Humanistic orientation
Self-efficacy
Service recipients
Service providers
Supports
Shalem Fund study




Born To Challenge. Adjustment and Personal Growth of Adults Raised by a Parent with a Mental or an Intellectual Disability   Catalog # 640| Supervised By: Prof. Liora Findler  

This work was supported by a grant from Shalem Fund
Progress in the discourse and legislation concerning the human rights of people with disabilities has led to the realization of their rights across many life domains, including the right to marry and to bear children

With regard to the potential impact of disability on parenting, most research until now has focused on parenting as experienced by the parents themselves. However when exploring the implications of parenting the perspective of the child – a crucial component of the context – remain under-researched
The objective of this study was to explore the unique and combined contribution of intrapersonal factors (attachment orientation and self-esteem), social-ecological factors (social support), and coping strategies the three representing protective factors – in the adjustment (mental health) and personal growth of adults raised by a parent with a mental or intellectual disability (a risk factor operationalized by perceived stress and parental bonding). A comparative analysis assessed these factors alongside a sample population of adults raised by parents without a disability

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Key words
People with intellectual developmental disabilities
Parents with a disability
Mental Disability
Adjustment
Growth
Equal Rights of Persons with Disabilities
Shalem Fund study




Emotional Intelligence and Psychological Capital: A Comparison between Adults with Intellectual Disabilities and Adults with Typical Development   Catalog # 890-152-2019| Supervised by: Prof. Hefziba Lifshitz-Vahav  

This work was supported by a grant from Shalem Fund
Over the years the emotional component has been completely absent from the definition of intellectual disability and these resources, emotional intelligence and other psychological aspects among the population of the intellectually disabled have not yet been examined. In our study, the question arises, why is the emotional component absent from the definition of the new intellectual disability, is it due to a lack of awareness of the subject of emotional intelligence? This issue has only developed over the past decade in a population with normal development or the definition designers thought that there was no difference in the level of emotional intelligence between people with intellectual disabilities and their friends with normal development

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For the English Abstract press here

Key words
People with intellectual developmental disabilities
Emotional intelligence
Psychological capital
Hope
Self-Efficacy
Resilience
Optimism
Gender
Chronological age
Place of residence
Quality of life
Shalem Fund study




The contribution of intervention program based on The Cycle of Internalized Learning CIL to deal with verbal violence and improve the quality of life of people with intellectual developmental disabilities living in domestic housing settings   Catalog # 890-67-2018| Other authors: Ran Neuman  

This work was supported by a grant from Shalem Fund
The present research presents an in-depth investigation of the phenomenon of verbal violence among adults with IDD

The aims of the research were first to Find out the nature and scope of such violence and second to Evaluate the contribution of an especially designed intervention program to decrease verbal violence by promoting awareness and interpersonal coping competencies

The sample included 99 adults with IDD, 64 participated in the intervention program, the remaining being a control group

Findings provided a comprehensive description of the phenomenon of verbal violence experienced by adults with IDD, and the efficacy of an intervention program to reduce such experiences

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Key words
People with intellectual developmental disabilities
Verbal Violence
The Cycle of Internalized Learning
Community setting house
Residental house
Shalem Fund study
 




The experience of siblings to individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities in immigrant families from the former Union of Soviet Socialist Republics   Catalog # 890-244-2020| Supervised by: PhD. Carmit-Noa Shpigelman  

This work was supported by a grant from Shalem Fund
This study investigates the experience of siblings to individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) in immigrant families from the former Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR). A qualitative paradigm was used, in this study, by interviewing ten individuals, who are siblings to a brother or sister with IDD. A qualitative content analysis of the interviews transcripts revealed five main themes. Families dealing with a child with IDD, the sibling role perception to an individual with IDD in the family, Siblings relationship, Implications of being a sibling to a child with IDD and Thinking ahead and looking into to the future

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For the English Abstract
press here


Key words
People with intellectual developmental disabilities
Siblings relationship
Immigrant Families
Former Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, USSR.
Shalem Fund study

 




Between Secularization and Religiosity in Israel: Differences in Muslim Social Workers and Imams' Recommendations Regarding Marriage/Divorce and Child Custody Issues of Persons with Intellectual Disabilities and Mental Illness   Catalog # 890-175-2019| Supervised by: Prof. Arie Rimmerman  

This work was supported by a grant from Shalem Fund
The present study examines differences in Muslim social workers and Imams' recommendations regarding marriage/divorce and child custody Issues of persons with intellectual disabilities and mental illness. The population studied consisted of the majority of the Muslim social workers (138), working in 11 social service departments in the Northern Triangle municipalities and most of the imams (48) employed by the Interior Ministry in the same region. The research questionnaire included the following questionnaires background questionnaire; Social Worker Religiousness Questionnaire (DUREL; Koenig & Büssing, 2010), and a questionnaire that included 25 vignettes constructed by the researcher based on the Sharia Court rulings, adapted to the study. The model has been tested by CHAID Chi-squared Automatic Interaction Detector algorithm using SPSS 
When explicitly stated that the family was religious or observant, it received special attention by Muslim social workers and imams

In general Muslim social workers inclined to make a religious recommendation when the family of a person with intellectual disability or mental illness was explicitly described as religious. The same result was obtained in the general analysis of the imams. On the other hand, in analyzing Muslim social worker recommendations related to vignettes of intellectual disability, it was found that the type of issue (marriage, divorce and child custody) was relevant to the recommendations and not necessarily the family's religiousness

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Key words
People with intellectual developmental disabilities
Mental Illness
Secularization
Religion
Social Workers
Child Custody, Marriage, Divorce
Shale Fund study




Life stories Narratives of Adults with Dual Diagnosis of Intellectual Disability and Mental Disorders: Personal Identity, Quality of Life and Future Orientation   Catalog # 890-64-2018 | Supervised by: Batya Hefziba Lifshitz  

This work was supported by a grant from Shalem Fund
The aim of this study was to examine the narratives of life stories told by adults with dual diagnosis of intellectual disability and mental disorders, through the aspects of: personal identity, quality of life and future orientation. There were 12 participants with intellectual disability and mental disorders of schizophrenia and personal disorders
The research model is based on the" Three Function Model of Autobiographical Memory")Pillemer, 2003 ;Bluck, Alea, Habermas, & Rubin, 2005: Harris, Rasmussen, & Berntsen, 2014(.The method of the research was Narrative qualitative by applying a semi built- in interviews (Shkedi, 2003;Tracy, 2019). The findings showed that the mental disability is dominant in the personal identity and it was significantly higher than the awareness to the intellectual disability
The life quality of the participants is much better in the present in comparison to the past. From the perspective of future orientation, the findings indicate that there are aspirations in regard to employment, relations, family and health. But the main aspiration, in a significant way, is the aspiration for independence and for having control over their lives

For the Full text in Hebrew press here
For the English Abstract press here


Key words
People with intellectual developmental disabilities
Life stories
Dual diagnosis
Mental disorders
Schizophrenia
Personal disorders
Personal identity
Quality of life
Future orientation
Shalem Fund study
 




Evaluation of the contribution of Shalem Fund's projects during the period of the Corona   Catalog # 890-236-2020| PhD. Adi Levi Vered, Noga Chen  

This study was carried out by 'Michlol'- the Assessment and Measurement Unit of the Shalem Fund
During March-April 2020, with the spread of the corona virus in Israel and the entry of the country's citizens into the first closure of their homes Shalem Fund implemented a number of initiatives to assist families dealing with a relative with various disabilities, to support professionals on the field and to accompany them in assisting families during this period
The initiatives that were implemented and evaluated by 'Michlol' - the Assessment and Measurement Unit of the Shalem Fund in various ways are

Encouragement grant for the period of isolation - a financial grant to the local authorities for the benefit of leisure equipment for families of people with disabilities, which was transferred to 230 local authorities in Israel who responded to public appeal that published by Shalem Fund

Online lectures on challenging behavior subject - online lectures on two topics for families and professionals - Leaving the line of confrontation and Dealing with challenging behavior in the days of Corona using the container-intervention method- container model

WhatsApp group to professionals in the field of people with intellectual developmental disabilities- in order to convey messages relevant to the closure period quickly and effectively   The group has 140 members

Shalem For You website for people with disabilities - a unique website that was established thanks to a donation from OM-Two company and that was built with the help of Idan Bar company   The site is accessible to the population of people with intellectual developmental disabilities and concentrates content collected from around the web in simple and accessible language

To read the full findings report in Hebrew press here
To read the executive summary in Hebrew press here

To view the summarizing presentation of results in Hebrew press here

Key Words
People with intellectual developmental disabilities
Leisure
Emergency
Therapists and staff
Cognitive accessibility
The family unit
Shalem Fund study




Examining the inclusion of students with Intellectual Developmental Disability in Israel, main characteristics and degree of satisfaction among teaching staff, students and their parents   Catalog # 890-66-2018 | Other authors: Gilada Avissar  

This work was supported by a grant from Shalem Fund
A questionnaire and an individual interview were used in this research to examine mainstreaming and inclusion processes of students with Intellectual Developmental Disability (IDD) in Israel. The participants included the educational school staff, the students without and with IDD and parents of the latter in the Jewish sector in Israel. Several additional dimensions were examined  academic, social and behavioral aspects of the students with IDD; how different stakeholders perceive the affective ecology of mainstreamed students; the degree of satisfaction with mainstreaming among different stakeholders and how students without IDD perceive inclusion
Main findings were: students with IDD are fully and/or partially mainstreamed on an individual basis or they attend fully inclusive schools; more factors promoting mainstreaming were found than factors hindering it; being part of a regular class is perceived as an opportunity for social integration; students with IDD are perceived by their peers to be an integral part of the class and, at the same time, it is understood they might need extra help


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For the English Abstract press here


Key words
People with intellectual developmental disabilities
Mainstreaming
Inclusion
socio-emotional aspect
parents
educational staff
Shale Fund study

 




Evaluation of the pilot program in the field of aging accessible among people with intellectual developmental disabilities and the people around them   Catalog # 890-155-2019 | PhD. Adi Levi Vered, Noga Chen  

This study was carried out by 'Michlol'- the Assessment and Measurement Unit of the Shalem Fund
The aging process is accompanied by effects that are characteristic the entire population and mainly include reduction and lack of regeneration that are manifested in three dimensions that are integrated with each other and in the aging process The three simensions are 
the biological dimension (physical and cognitive), the emotional dimension and the social dimension. An aging person with intellectual developmental disability experiences the same effects but to these effects are added difficulties caused as a result of and / or associated with the disability itself, such as reducing the connection with the family members who have grown old and leaving them without a significant family support, coping with grief, declining employment and more
In order to assist in proper preparation for old age and to better cope with the expected transitions and challenges, a program has been developed to deliver tailored workshops for people with intellectual developmental disabilities who focus on making the issue of aging accessible, combined with family support and the professional system that accompanies them The program was developed by an inter-organizational team with expertise in this area and working with this population Dr Dalia Nissim, Professional Director of the "Trump Institute" at 'Izzy Shapira House'; Dr. Michal Wolf, Director of the Alvin Haifa and north district; Social Worker Tova Pinkas, Director of the Alvin Jerusalem Day Centers; Avi Holler  director of the day centers for retirees at the Alvin Hasharon and the center district; Gal Azvelos - CEO of 'Gal Dormitories; Noga Spielberg - Professional Manager of 'Gal Dormitories
The program was first transferred as a pilot in the year 2019 at the Center for retirees with intellectual developmental disabilities in two authorities: Holon and Rehovot. The pilot was accompanied by a design evaluation by 'Michlol'- the Assessment and Measurement Unit of the Shalem Fund, in order to improve the program / workshops and examine the degree of its success and contribution to the various audiences. The pilot findings are presented in this document

To read the full findings report in Hebrew press here
To view the summarizing presentation of results in Hebrew press here
To read the executive summary in Hebrew press here


Key Words
People with intellectual developmental disabilities
Aging
Shalem Fund study




Perceptions of Life in the Community among Young Adults with Intellectual Developmental Disabilities   Catalog # 139| Other Authors: Prof. Arie Rimmerman, Prof. Malka Margalit  

This work was supported by a grant from Shalem Fund
This report presents findings from five years of longitudinal research that examined life in the community as perceived by young adults with intellectual developmental disabilities and their parents, using quantitative and qualitative methodologies. The study included 126 young persons and their parents. The young  persons’ age at entry to the study ranged from 15-30 years (M = 20.33, SD = 4.00). In line with the United Nations Charter for the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, and to address the lack of longitudinal studies tracing these young people’s quality of life, this research focused on examining the socio-functional person environment model and on exploring resilience factors. Distinct developmental trajectories were identified for the research variables (e.g., quality of life, choice, effort) among the study participants with intellectual disability. In addition, the outcomes highlighted the contribution of young people’s, parental and family variables (e.g., support and effort indices, parental resources, and family climate) in explaining the quality of life in these young people

For the Full text in Hebrew press here
For the English Abstract press here


Key words
People with intellectual developmental disabilities
Young adults
Coping
Emotional resources
Hope
Sense of coherence
Socioemotional adjustment
Families
Resilience
Work
Social relationships
Shalem Fund study




Project to Provide Cognitive Accessibility at Museums and Recreation Sites   Catalog # 142| Other Authors: Hila Rimon-Greenspan, Yossi Freier-Dror& Prof. Shira Yalon-Chamovitz  

This work was supported by a grant from Shalem Fund
Akim Israel in collaboration with the National Insurance Institute of Israel, the Shalem Fund and the Ministry of Social Services initiated and launched a unique project for the cognitive accessibility of museums. Four museums participated in the project, and a fifth museum was used for comparison. In the present study the level of learning and satisfaction of Intellectually disabled visitors was assessed before and after the accessibility process of each museum. The quantitative findings confirm that the change in knowledge is greater in the accessible museums in the non-accessible ones. At the same time, knowledge remains low There was no confirmation that the accessibility of the museums increases satisfaction. Satisfaction was found to be very high prior to making the museums accessible, and it was found to be related to other components like: length of tour, group size, degree of physical access, transitions within the museum, space allotted for guidance (open / closed), accompanying support staff, use of participant name tags, nature of training, using aids, linguistic simplification, using symbols, active learning and creating a fun visiting experience

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For the English Abstract press here


Key words
People with intellectual developmental disabilities
Accessibility
Museum
Evaluative research
Knowledge assessment
Satisfaction
Language simplification

Shalem Fund study